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Information sheets and handouts - Engineering Division

The City of Bloomington, Minnesota, makes no representation or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the reuse of the data provided herewith, regardless of its format or the means of its transmission. There is no guarantee or representation to the user as to the accuracy, currency, suitability or reliability of this data for any purpose. The user accepts the data "as is", and assumes all risks associated with its use. By acceptance of this data, the user agrees not to transmit this data or provide access to it or any part of it to another party unless the user shall include with the data a copy of this disclaimer. The City of Bloomington, Minnesota, assumes no responsibility for actual or consequential damage incurred as a result of any user's reliance on this data.

Standard Construction Details and Specifications

Public improvement projects, such as street reconstruction, and private developments, such as building a hotel parking lot, must meet design standards. The Standard Construction Details are drawings of various municipal items, such as manholes, catch basins and erosion control fences. Engineers developing construction plans can download and use these drawings. The Standard Specification for Construction is required for all construction projects within the City limits.

The following handouts provide guides to engineering requirements that govern a topic. For more information, contact the Engineering Division at 952-563-4870.

Driveways: Residential

Related Handouts

Specifications for Construction

Standard Construction Details

These AutoCAD 2007 formatted drawings are grouped in the categories listed below and saved within compressed Zip files.

Disclaimer
The City of Bloomington makes no representation or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the reuse of the data provided herewith, regardless of its format or the means of its transmission. There is no guarantee or representation to the user as to the accuracy, currency, suitability, or reliability of this data for any purpose. The user accepts the data "as is", and assumes all risks associated with its use. By acceptance of this data, the user agrees not to transmit this data or provide access to it or any part of it to another party or individual. The City of Bloomington assumes no responsibility for actual or consequential damage incurred as a result of any user's reliance on this data.

Benchmarks (interactive map)

This interactive map displays the locations of benchmarks in Bloomington. Click on a benchmark to access its elevation and other related information.

Updating Driveway Approach Standards

Sealcoating Your Asphalt Driveway?

Whether you plan to seal your own driveway or hire a professional contractor, be aware that a new law was passed to protect our environment from harmful chemicals in coal tar-based driveway sealcoats.

Statewide ban now in effect in Minnesota

Effective January 1, 2014, the sales and use of coal tar-based sealcoats are banned in Minnesota. The ban will minimize the unnecessary release of harmful and persistent chemicals into our environment. The coal tar-based sealcoat ban is expected to reduce 67% of the PAHs going into the environment, but vehicle emissions and residential wood-burning account for the other 30% and are less feasible to address.

What's all the Coal Tar fuss about?

Among the chemicals in coal tar-based sealcoat, coal tar pitch is known to cause cancer in humans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are probable human carcinogens. The more persistent PAHs can harm the aquatic food chain. Studies around the U.S. have shown that PAHs are released from coal tar-based sealcoats into the air and homes, workplaces, and shopping centers, and also into ponds, lakes and streams. In addition to the potential health risk of PAHs, there can be substantial costs for cities and private property owners to manage sediment in stormwater ponds that is contaminated with PAHs from coal tar-based sealants. Coal-tar-based sealcoats have been on the market since the early 1960s, but only recently have the adverse health risks become widely known, still very little has been published to date about the potential for adverse human-health outcomes.

For more information visit the MPCA web page linked below:

What are other sources of PAHs?

PAHs are a group of organic compounds formed when burning anything carbon based, either naturally or from human activity, be it wood, gasoline or even just grilling your steak. Some PAHs are known carcinogens and are persistent in the environment, while others decompose easily and are of little health risk. Some skin and hair care products also contain PAHs. Coal tar based sealants contain 1000 times more PAHs than do similarly performing asphalt based sealants. The City continues to use an asphalt based emulsified sealer during the rock/chip sealcoating maintenance of our streets, which contains minimal PAHs.

What should I do?

Before you buy materials or hire somebody, ask to ensure that the sealcoat is either a diluted asphalt emulsion , an asphalt/polymer blend, or other alternative that does not contain coal tar pitch. Do not select products if their container labels, or product information show the words "coal tar," "refined coal tar," "refined tar," "refined coal tar pitch," "coal tar pitch volatiles," "RT-12," "tar" or similar terms.

Driveway Care Basics

  • Monitor your pavement's condition and invest in treatments before significant deterioration occurs.
  • Good Habits can prevent damage.
    • Place blocks under motorcycle and bicycle kickstands, trailer tongue jacks and other point loads to prevent surface indentations.
    • Avoid turns while your vehicle is stationary to reduce surface scuffing.
    • Clean up spilled gas, oil or other petroleum products with absorbent pads or oil-dry to minimize permanent damage to the asphalt pavement.
  • When maintenance is needed, talk to two or more sealcoat contractors, sealcoat providers or pavement engineering consultants with experience using safer alternatives to coal tar like petroleum asphalt-based products. Consider sealing cracks before serious deterioration occurs; cracking is fairly common in our cold climate.
  • Work only with providers who can show you complete product data sheets so you can avoid coal tar content and make sure you are choosing safer alternatives.
  • Be aware of best application practices and make sure they are used.

Sources: MPCA and Minnesota Asphalt Pavement Association

Stormwater Pond Aeration Permit

Phosphorus Information and Ordinance

The City of Bloomington has an ordinance strictly limiting the use of phosphorus fertilizers.

Phosphorus Facts

On any bag or box of fertilizer, there is a string of three numbers. The middle number indicates the fertilizer's phosphorus content, measured as phosphate. Phosphorus is necessary to grow healthy lawns. However, most soils in Bloomington are already high in phosphorus, and adding more is not only unnecessary, but can be damaging to the environment.

To reduce the damage caused by phosphorus, a state law was passed in April 2002. The Bloomington City Council adopted an ordinance in July 2002 that brings City Code into agreement with the state law. (More information on this ordinance is offered below.)

To comply with the ordinance and law, and to help reduce the unwanted effects of excess fertilizers in our natural environment, follow these guidelines:

  • Apply only fertilizers whose middle numbers read "0", unless a valid soil test indicates a need for phosphorus.
  • Never apply fertilizer to paved or concrete surfaces.
  • Sweep spilled fertilizer off paved surfaces back into the lawn or garden it was intended for.
  • Keep soil, compost, animal droppings, manure, grass clippings, and leaves from washing into the street.

Remember, anything that enters a storm drain goes directly to a local lake or river.

Bloomington's Phosphorus Ordinance

Bloomington ordinance (City Code, Sec. 10.49-55) prohibits the use of fertilizers containing phosphorus on Bloomington lawns, in shoreland buffer areas, and on sidewalks and driveways. The ordinance was adopted in response to the Minnesota State Phosphorus Fertilizer Bill (S.F. No. 1555).

Exceptions where phosphorous fertilizer can still be used include:

  • Lawns that need phosphorus, as demonstrated by a valid soil test.
  • Newly established turf during the first growing season.
  • Golf courses.

The ordinance also requires that Bloomington stores that carry fertilizer containing phosphorus also carry phosphorus-free fertilizer. In addition, stores must display information regarding these regulations.

For a look at the actual wording of the phosphorus ordinance as it appears in the City Code, sections 10.49-10.55, click on the link below.

Traffic Code, Vehicle Regulations and Parking Regulations

Timeline

If you are interested, the program and procedure for local street traffic management is as follows:

  • Step 1. Request for Information - Download the   Traffic Calming Policy  for information about the program or contact Paul Jarvis, Traffic Management Coordinator at 952-563-4548 with questions.
  • Step 2. Application - The  Application  must be completed, with signatures from a minimum of 60% of the affected residences, and a $335 application fee deposited, by the first Monday of February.
  • Step 3. Evaluation of Applications - All applications will be reviewed by the Bloomington Fire, Police, Public Works, Transit and School District for comment on potential conflicts. The applications will then be screened and ranked. Two neighborhoods will be selected for the current program. Public open houses will be scheduled for the planned trial projects. At the open houses we will discuss the proposed traffic calming plan and costs to the neighborhood  Local Street traffic Calming Assessment Policy . Applications not chosen will be put into the pool of applicants for the next program year.
  • Step 4. Before Data Collection - City staff will collect speed and volume data in the benefited area and on alternate routes that may be negatively affected, before installation of the trial device.
  • Step 5. After Data Collection - After the trial device is installed, the speed and volume data will be re-collected.
  • Step 6. Public Input - A neighborhood meeting will be held to discuss the results of the trial devices. After the meeting, input surveys with "Petition and Waiver of Hearing" forms will be mailed to the property owners in the benefited area.
  • Step 7. Recommendations to City Council - Staff will present the recommendations to the City Council.
  • Step 8. City Council Meeting, Assessment Hearing, Ordering of Project - The Hearings will be held the same night and if assessment roll is not adopted, the plans and specifications will not be ordered and the project is terminated.
  • Step 9. City Council final approval of plans, specifications and engineer's estimate.
  • Step 10. Letting and Construction
  • Step 11. Preparation of final assessment & notice to property owners.
  • Step 12. After Data Collection - Staff will collect data following completion of the construction and during the following year.