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ADA Transition Plan for Public Right-of-Way

The overall goal for an ADA transition plan is to provide access to all.  As such, the city has developed a draft plan to make roads, sidewalks and trails more accessible, as outlined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Click here to learn more about ADA.  

The transition plan provides a better understanding of the Bloomington assets in the right-of-way.  It includes pedestrian ramps with truncated domes to audible pedestrian signals and even obstructions like power poles in the sidewalk.  It will also help us develop our investment priorities in the future.

City Council approved the plan at their November 7, 2016 meeting.

PDF icon City of Bloomington ADA Transition Plan for Public Right-of-Way

City of Bloomington has developed a draft plan to make roads, sidewalks and trails more accessible, as outlined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Textual description of infographic

The above infographic depicts information and data relating to the City of Bloomington's draft plan to make roads, sidewalks and trails more accessible, as outlined by the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The top heading says, "ADA Right of Way Transition Plan: Provide access to all."

A block of text describes a Right of Way area as follows: "It includes pedestrian ramps with truncated domes to audible pedestrian signals (APS) and even obstructions lie power poses in the sidewalk. The Transition Plan reviews and develops the City's policies, practices and programs involving upgrades to public rights-of-way."

An adjacent block of text asks, "Think this doesn't apply to you? Think again."  Beneath the text, a statistic; 70-80% of the population will experience a disability that restricts mobility at least once in their lifetime.  Additionally, a block text below described, “Ever broken a leg, had knee surgery or otherwise been hampered with your mobility?  Then this plan applies to you.”

A banner follows with the words, "City of Bloomington," followed by a graph showing that 3 of Bloomington's 62 traffic signals provided audible pedestrian signals as of 2015, and then a pie chart showing the tripping 17.1% of sidewalk tripping hazards were repaired in 2015, with an additional 19.% in 2016, leaving 63.6% of repairs incomplete.

A bar graph below shows the number of accessible pedestrian ramps improvements on the Y axis and the year on the X axis.  In 2010, 5 new ramps, and 281 to remove and replace; 2011, 39 new, 367 remove and replace; 2012, 50 new, 241 remove and replace; 2013, 26 new, 164 remove and replace; 2014, 60 new, 145 remove and replace; 2015, 46 new, 181 remove and replace.

The last block of text at the bottom says, “The City of Bloomington complies with all applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities.  Upon request, accommodation will be provided to allow individuals with disabilities to participate in all City of Bloomington services, programs, and activities.  The City has designated coordinators to facilitate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and to coordinate compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as mandated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations. For information, contact the Human Services Division, City of Bloomington, 1800 West Old Shakopee Road, Bloomington, MN 55431-3027; (952)563-8733 (Voice); (952)563-8740 (TTY). Upon request, this information can be available in Braille, large print, audio tape and/or electronic format.”

ADA Public Right of Way Transition Plan - 2017 Update

As part of the ADA Public Right of Way Transition Plan, the self-evaluation continues and an additional 588 pedestrian ramps were inspected in 2017. This leaves approximately 2,300 pedestrian ramps yet to be inspected of the nearly 5,000 City owned ramps. Six new pedestrian ramps were installed and 147 were removed and replaced in City right-of-way. The percent of curb ramps that have met accessibility criteria, of those inspected to date, has increased to almost 43% as non-compliant ramps have been replaced as part of construction projects like the Pavement Management Program.

Other ADA information/transition plans applicable in Bloomington