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Predatory offenders

Frequently Asked Questions

What types of offenses require registration in Minnesota?

The following require registration:

  • Criminal Sexual Conduct and Felony Level Indecent Exposure
  • Kidnapping and False Imprisonment
  • Soliciting a minor to engage in prostitution or sexual conduct
  • Using a minor in a sexual performance
  • Possession of pictorial representations of minors

How long are offenders required to register?

  • All registrants are required to register for a minimum period of 10 years or the duration of probation, whichever is longer.
  • Some registrants are required to register for life.
  • Convictions for Failure to Register violations result in 5 additional years of registration.

What are the consequences for offenders who fail to register?

  • Each conviction for Failure to Register results in an additional 5 years being added to the subject's registration period and they are subject to a prison sentence.

What is a risk level?

  • Risk levels are assigned by the Minnesota Department of Corrections (DOC) not the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA).

Why doesn't every registrant have a risk level?

  • Approximately 75% of the offenders registered in Minnesota have never been assigned a risk level.
  • Juvenile registrants do not receive risk levels.
  • Registrants sentenced to probation do not receive risk levels.
  • Registrants who were released from a Minnesota prison prior to January 1, 1997, did not receive risk levels.

Are registrants allowed to have contact with children?

  • There are no provisions in M.S. § 243.166, Minnesota’s registration law, which prohibit registered offenders from having contact with minors.
  • Restricting contact with minors is frequently a condition of the registrant’s probation or parole; however, if the person is no longer on probation or parole, those restrictions are no longer effective. Inquiries regarding a registrant’s conditions of release should be directed to the registrant’s probation or parole officer.

Can registrants live near a school or daycare center?

  • There are no provisions in M.S. § 243.166, Minnesota’s registration law, which prohibit registered offenders from living in the vicinity of a school or daycare.

  • Restricting a registrant’s residency can be a condition of the registrant’s probation or parole; however, if the person is no longer on probation or parole, those restrictions are no longer effective. Inquiries regarding a registrant’s residency restrictions should be directed to the registrant’s probation or parole officer.

What should I do if I see a registered offender violating the terms of his supervision?

  • Call 911. A police officer will begin the investigation to see if charges can be filed. 

Overview of community notification law 

Legislative findings and purpose: "The legislature finds that if members of the public are provided adequate notice and information about a predatory offender who has been or is about to be released from custody and who lives or will live in or near their neighborhood, the community can develop constructive plans to prepare themselves and their children for the offender's release." The public risk posed by a predatory offender about to be release is assessed by a committee of experts. The offender is given a risk level by the Department of Corrections. Information about the offender, including their risk level, is sent to the law enforcement agency having primary jurisdiction over the area in which the offender plans to reside. The level of risk posed by the offender determines to whom law enforcement may disclose information. The following is an explanation of the levels assigned to each offender and who may be informed of their release.

Level 1: Low risk

Law enforcement may notify:

  • Other law enforcement agencies.
  • Any victims of, or witnesses to, the offense committed by the offender.

Level 2: Moderate risk

In addition to Level 1 notification, law enforcement may notify:

  • Schools and daycares.
  • Establishments and organizations that primarily serve individuals likely to be victimized by the offender.

Level 3: High risk

In addition to Level 2 notifications, law enforcement may notify:

  • Other members of the community whom the offender is likely to encounter.

To learn more and to conduct a Level 3 Predatory Offender search to retrieve public information about Level 3 offenders or locate information about adult offenders who have been committed to the Commissioner of Corrections, and who are still under our jurisdiction (i.e. in prison, or released from prison and still under supervision), visit the Department of Corrections.