Park prairies conserve resources, add beauty

Prairie landscapes have a rugged appeal that goes deeper than average turf. Waves of big bluestem and other tallgrass prairie provide habitat for pollinators, birds and wildlife. But there’s more to a prairie than natural beauty. Deep root systems collect organic carbon and help improve air and soil quality.  

Prairie restorations are all around the city. Many prairie plantings are tucked away in lesser used park areas, and on slopes and soggy spots that are harder to mow.  

Reynolds Park, 7201 West 83rd Street, has several areas of prairie along its perimeter, which was installed more than 20 years ago. The project was designed for conservation and to set an example. Today, prairies are more commonplace as an attractive, environmentally friendly choice for landscaping.  

Once established, prairie plants are self-sustaining and have little need of water, fertilizer and mowing. An occasional cut or prescribed burn keeps things in check.

For more information, visit blm.mn/maintenance or call 952-563-8760.