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Immunizations

Flu shots, prevention and care

Flu shots are available September - June

Public Health Center1900 W. Old Shakopee Rd., Bloomington, 55431

First and third Tuesdays of each month from 3:15 - 5:15 p.m. in the Immunization Clinic. (You do not need an appointment.)

Upcoming flu shot clinics:

  • Tuesday, December 4, 4 - 6 p.m. at Oak Grove Middle School

Weekdays, 11:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Contact Public Health at 952-563-8900 to speak with a nurse. 

  • Children under 18 years must have a parent or guardian present.
  • Shots will be given to persons 6 months of age and older. 
  • Bring your insurance card so your insurance company can be billed. Let us know if you do not have insurance. No one will be turned away for lack of insurance coverage

Frequently asked questions

Will I get sick from the flu shot?

No. The flu shot will not cause the flu itself. Reports of mild reactions to the flu shot however are not uncommon. These side effects include soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site. Other reactions may include a low-grade fever, headache and body aches. Side effects typically appear soon after receiving the flu shot and last 1-2 days.

Do I need a flu shot if I am healthy?

The flu vaccine isn't like other vaccines with longer-lasting protection. Even if you had a flu shot last season, you will need a flu shot this year to be protected. Flu viruses are unpredictable, and every season puts you at risk.

Anyone can become sick with the flu and experience serious complications. Seniors, babies, pregnant women and people with medical conditions like asthma, diabetes, heart disease, or kidney disease are at especially high risk from the flu. However, kids, teens and adults who are active and healthy also can get the flu and become very ill from it.

How does the flu shot work?

The flu shot causes antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after receiving the vaccine. These antibodies will provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

Is it ever too late in the season to get a flu shot?

Flu seasons are unpredictable. They can begin early in the fall and last late into the spring. As long as flu season isn't over, it's not too late to get vaccinated, even during the winter.

Getting a flu shot is the best way to protect yourself and your family. If you missed getting your flu vaccine in the fall, get your flu vaccine now for protection all season long.

Is it the cold or the flu?

Signs and symptoms Influenza Cold
Onset Sudden Gradual
Fever Temperature of 100° F and above, lasting 3-4 days None or a temperature of less than 100° F
Cough Dry, sometimes severe Hacking
Headache Prominent Rare
Muscle pain Usual, often severe Uncommon or mild
Tiredness and weakness Lasting 2-3 weeks Very mild and brief
Extreme exhaustion Early and prominent Never
Chest discomfort Common Uncommon or mild
Stuffy nose Sometimes Common
Sneezing Sometimes Typical
Sore throat Sometimes Common

Flu prevention and care

Flu prevention

  • Get plenty of rest, physical activity and eat healthy.
  • Stay home from school or work if you have a respiratory infection. Avoid exposing yourself to others who are sick with flu-like symptoms.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue whenever you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue away. If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
  • Clean surfaces you touch frequently, such as doorknobs, water faucets, refrigerator handles and telephones.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

When to seek care

Most people can fight the flu at home with rest and fluids. If you are in a group at high risk for complications and you become sick with the flu virus, you should contact your health care provider early on so that you can be given antiviral medication if needed. Contact your health care provider if your symptoms worsen.